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Pressure Washing in Wadmalaw Island, SC

South Carolina is undoubtedly one of the best places to call home in the Southeast. Cities like Charleston boast a rich history, pleasant climate, delicious food, friendly locals, and a laid-back atmosphere that captures the essence of southern hospitality. However, for homeowners and business owners, living in Charleston comes with its own set of challenges, especially when it comes to maintaining the appearance of your property.

The humid weather in the area often results in mold and algae growth on surfaces like wood and concrete, which can make your property look unkempt and neglected. Fortunately, Peppers Pressure Washing can help restore your property's beauty and prevent future growth and grime.

Why Choose Peppers Pressure Washing?

When it comes to pressure washing in Wadmalaw Island, SC, our #1 goal is delivering exceptional pressure washing services by going above and beyond to make sure our clients are satisfied. We ensure their satisfaction by prioritizing good old-fashioned hard work, honest pricing, ongoing communication, advanced training, and industry-leading customer service.

Our pressure washing company in South Carolina is the perfect choice to protect your home or business from mold and mildew across various surfaces. In doing so, we can help minimize unsightly objects like bird's nests and spiderwebs while protecting your property from damage to windows, gutters, roofing, and more. As a licensed, insured pressure washing company, our customer's health and happiness always come first - no questions asked.

So, when you hire Peppers Pressure Washing, you can rest easy knowing our experts will treat your home as if it were our own. When they need the highest quality pressure washing services, clients come to us because our team is:

  • Licensed & Insured
  • Residential & Commercial Pressure Washing Experts
  • Equipped with Modern Equipment & Pressure Washing Tools
  • Provide Free Estimates
  • Serve Greater Charleston, SC
  • Has Outstanding Reviews on Google & Facebook
  • Have Years of Experience with Professional Pressure Washing

Service Areas

If you're looking for a dedicated professional that will do the job right, you're in the right place. With over 10 years experience, we have learned to improve our skills and keep our equipment up to date for the best results.

Kickstart Your Home's Curb Appeal with Residential Pressure Washing in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Living in the Lowcountry often means that your home's exterior will suffer from harsh elements such as mildew, dirt, and pollen. If left uncleaned, these contaminants can cause damage to surfaces like brick, stucco, and vinyl over time. At Peppers Pressure Washing, we offer a safe and effective cleaning solution that utilizes time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants from your home's exterior so that it remains uniquely beautiful year-round.

Unlike some pressure washing services in Charleston, however, we have the capability to perform traditional pressure washing as well as low-pressure washing for residential properties.

What is Low-Pressure Washing?

Most often known as "soft washing," this process involves washing and rinsing your windows and gutters using gentle pressure. Unlike high-pressure tactics - which can cause damage when used by amateurs in inappropriate spaces - soft wash cleaning for your home is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae from porous surfaces without causing harm. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about losing curb appeal or reducing the resale value of your home due to stripped paint or ruined siding.

Our techniques use gentle water pressure and an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants without causing harm to your plants or landscaping. That's why many homeowners ask for a combination of soft washing and pressure washing in Wadmalaw Island, SC - to address the hard-to-clean areas as well as the more sensitive areas.

Once the cleaning agent has removed the mold, algae, and other contaminants, our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home, leaving it looking squeaky clean and envy-worthy to your neighbors. Some additional benefits of Peppers Pressure Washing's soft washing approach include:

  • Reduced Chance of Water Penetration and Damage to Your Home
  • Fewer Ladders and Scaffolding Means Can Mean Reduced Labor Costs
  • Mildew, Mold, and Algae are Killed at the Molecular Level
  • Less Water Needed to Clean Your Home vs. High-Pressure Washing
  • Your Home is Disinfected and Cleaned

Curious if our team can remove the mold and mildew from your driveway, walkways, back deck, and more? Give our office a call today - every estimate we provide is 100% free.

Pressure Washing Wadmalaw Island, SC

The Toughest Items That Pressure Washing Can Clean

Experienced professionals can enhance your property's curb appeal with well-laid driveways and patios. The same goes for the fencing around your backyard, which can be painted and installed meticulously by experts. However, it's only a matter of time before stains, peeling paint, and other tough-to-remove items begin to sully your home's appearance. Fortunately, with an experienced pressure washing company by your side, you can bring life back to your home, even if it's been plagued by something like graffiti.

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Motor vehicles are notorious for leaving oil stains on driveways and in garages, which can be very difficult to get out if you don't know what you're doing. Fortunately, a high-pressure power washer will remove such stains. But even with a pressure washer, you'll need to use the appropriate cleaning solution to fully remove an oil stain from your driveway.

Motor vehicles are notorious for leaving oil stains on driveways and in garages, which can be very difficult to get out if you don't know what you're doing. Fortunately, a high-pressure power washer will remove such stains. But even with a pressure washer, you'll need to use the appropriate cleaning solution to fully remove an oil stain from your driveway.

Motor vehicles are notorious for leaving oil stains on driveways and in garages, which can be very difficult to get out if you don't know what you're doing. Fortunately, a high-pressure power washer will remove such stains. But even with a pressure washer, you'll need to use the appropriate cleaning solution to fully remove an oil stain from your driveway.

Motor vehicles are notorious for leaving oil stains on driveways and in garages, which can be very difficult to get out if you don't know what you're doing. Fortunately, a high-pressure power washer will remove such stains. But even with a pressure washer, you'll need to use the appropriate cleaning solution to fully remove an oil stain from your driveway.

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Commercial Building Pressure Washing in South Carolina

Entrepreneurs understand the importance of presenting a positive image for their brand and business. A first impression is often the only opportunity to showcase what you have to offer. Neglecting the cleanliness and appearance of your warehouse, apartment complex, or storefront could lead to lost revenue. Put yourself in your customers' shoes: If a business owner fails to maintain walkways and other heavily trafficked areas around their location, they may not put much effort into providing quality products.

Every aspect of your building, entrance, parking lot, walking path, or storefront presents an opportunity to impress customers. With commercial pressure washing, you can capitalize on that opportunity and even help retain the same customers you initially impressed. The bottom line? If cleanliness and curb appeal are non-negotiable in your line of business, it's time to call Peppers Pressure Washing for a free estimate.

Don't delay - waiting to have your business pressure washed can end up costing you money. That's why our pressure washing company offers convenient monthly cleanings. We can arrange routine maintenance washing to help keep your business fresh and clean, helping you set the stage for success year-round.

Our company specializes in many types of commercial pressure washing in Wadmalaw Island, SC. Some of the most popular business locations we serve include the following:

  • Pressure Washing for Dumpster Pads
  • Pressure Washing for HOAs
  • Pressure Washing for Commercial Buildings
  • Pressure Washing for Sidewalks
  • Pressure Washing for Storefronts
  • Pressure Washing for Restaurants
  • Pressure Washing for Apartments & Condos
  • Much More

5 Signs That It's Time for Commercial Pressure Washing in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Investing in exterior cleaning is a wise decision for any business owner. Services like pressure washing enhance curb appeal, attract new and returning customers, and show you care about the appearance of your business. But if you're like other hardworking entrepreneurs who are stretched thin as it is, keeping up with cleanliness is easier said than done, especially outside your property.

Here are a few of the most common signs that it's time to consider pressure washing for your business in South Carolina.

Have you noticed that revenue is down, but you can't put your finger on why? In some instances, it could be because of your company's entryways and exteriors. A well-maintained exterior is essential for any business, whether it's a law firm, retail store, or any other establishment. Customers expect to see a property that looks clean, safe, and comfortable. They don't want to feel surrounded by discolored surfaces, mold, or mildew.

Have you noticed that revenue is down, but you can't put your finger on why? In some instances, it could be because of your company's entryways and exteriors. A well-maintained exterior is essential for any business, whether it's a law firm, retail store, or any other establishment. Customers expect to see a property that looks clean, safe, and comfortable. They don't want to feel surrounded by discolored surfaces, mold, or mildew.

Have you noticed that revenue is down, but you can't put your finger on why? In some instances, it could be because of your company's entryways and exteriors. A well-maintained exterior is essential for any business, whether it's a law firm, retail store, or any other establishment. Customers expect to see a property that looks clean, safe, and comfortable. They don't want to feel surrounded by discolored surfaces, mold, or mildew.

Have you noticed that revenue is down, but you can't put your finger on why? In some instances, it could be because of your company's entryways and exteriors. A well-maintained exterior is essential for any business, whether it's a law firm, retail store, or any other establishment. Customers expect to see a property that looks clean, safe, and comfortable. They don't want to feel surrounded by discolored surfaces, mold, or mildew.

You Can't Get Rid of Mold, Mildew, and Other Stains

If you notice unsightly stains, mold, or mildew on the outside of your business, it may be a sign of standing water issues or simply a lack of regular cleaning. Sure, you could make your own bleach solution and try to tackle the problem yourself. But you run the risk of damaging your property and even harming yourself in the process. The alternative? Contact Peppers Pressure Washing for thoroughly effective pressure washing in Wadmalaw Island, SC.

Why Hire a Professional Pressure Washing Company in South Carolina?

At Peppers Pressure Washing, one of the most common questions we receive is why a homeowner or business owner should or should not hire professionals to handle pressure washing. We get it - most folks are on budgets and must be careful about spending frivolously on chores that they may be able to do on their own. And while we're big proponents of DIY projects at home and at work, pressure washing in Wadmalaw Island, SC, should always be performed by trained professionals. Here's why.

Safety

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Cost Effectiveness

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Quicker Turnaround Times

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Eco-Friendly Techniques

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Avoid Damage to Your Home or Business

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

The Top Choice for Pressure Washing in Wadmalaw Island, SC

At Peppers Pressure Washing, we evaluate every pressure washing project with a fresh eye, knowing that no two situations are ever the same. As a licensed and insured pressure washing company in South Carolina, our goal is to leave your home and property looking its best, whether you need a one-time cleaning for your driveway or recurring services for your business. Whatever your needs may be, you can always rely on Peppers Pressure Washing for high-quality power washing at cost-conscious prices.

Contact our office today to arrange for your free estimate.

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Latest News in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Charleston leaders plan $30M project to improve Johns Island traffic

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Officials with the city of Charleston and Charleston County have announced a plan to address traffic concerns on Johns Island.Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg said the plan is the result of collaboration between the city of Charleston and Charleston County and will tackle traffic flow problems at the intersection of Maybank Highway and River Road, portions of Maybank Highway and the northern and southern Pitchforks, Tecklenburg said.“Traffic congestion has been a huge issue coming and going on J...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Officials with the city of Charleston and Charleston County have announced a plan to address traffic concerns on Johns Island.

Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg said the plan is the result of collaboration between the city of Charleston and Charleston County and will tackle traffic flow problems at the intersection of Maybank Highway and River Road, portions of Maybank Highway and the northern and southern Pitchforks, Tecklenburg said.

“Traffic congestion has been a huge issue coming and going on Johns Island,” he said. “And it was accentuated when that traffic light got added down the street. And everyone came to the realization that we needed to go back and rethink what got done six or seven years ago, what’s been done since then and what can we do collectively and collaboratively to make it better and make improvements.”

The city and county laid out the main points of the plan:

“Pitchforks” means two new roads that will branch off of Maybank towards River.

“The current cost estimate sits somewhere between $25 and $30 million to do all of this,” Charleston County Councilmember Joe Boykin said.

Tecklenburg said the money will come from future sales tax and Department of Transportation funding and once permitted, will apply for federal funding.

The full construction funding will have to be identified and approved by both city and county councils, according to Tecklenburg.

The first goal for short-term, interim improvements to Maybank Highway are expected to be complete in the first quarter of 2024, Tecklenburg said.

Robby Lingenfelter who works on Johns Island said he’s hopeful about the project but still frustrated.

“They say that the northern pitchfork will be completed by the first quarter of 2024, that’s good,” he said. “Southern pitchfork they said will take years, so we’re still five to ten years from alleviating the issues we have now.”

He said the city and county have been meeting since June to address the traffic issues on Johns Island.

“It’s going to happen. We are committed to making that happen,” Tecklenburg said.

Some locals question the mayor’s timing.

“Hearing this press conference that is happening five days before an election, can’t help but notice that a lot of this was conceptual and funding for a lot of this isn’t even secured,” Logan Mcvey said. “So, this seems like more talk and a lot more traffic just sitting and waiting on stuff to happen.”

Tecklenburg’s response was that they needed enough vetting through engineers and design teams before the plans could be presented.

Charleston County Council member Jenny Huneycutt, Charleston City Council member Karl Brady and the city’s planning and traffic directors also attended the news conference.

WATCH THE CHARLESTON LEADERS ANNOUNCE THE JOHNS ISLAND TRAFFIC IMPROVEMENT PLAN BELOW

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Discover the Largest Island in South Carolina (And the Creatures that Call It Home)

South Carolina has 35 barrier islands (also called sea islands), more than any other state except Florida. Barrier islands run paralle...

South Carolina has 35 barrier islands (also called sea islands), more than any other state except Florida. Barrier islands run parallel to the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and shield the mainland from the brunt of sea storms. The islands are home to wide sandy beaches, sea grass beds, vegetated uplands, and Lowcountry marshes.

What Is the Largest Island in South Carolina?

At 84 square miles in area, Johns Island is the largest island in South Carolina. Located in Charleston County, it’s the fourth largest island on the East Coast. Situated between the city of Charleston and the barrier island beaches that border the Atlantic Coast, a portion of the island is located within the city limits of Charleston.

Technically an island, yet not bordered by the open sea, the Stono and Kiawah Rivers are what separates Johns Island from its border islands and the mainland.

What Is the History of Johns Island?

Colonialists arrived on Johns Island from English settlements in the Caribbean and named it after Saint John Parish in Barbados. However, Native American tribes, including the Stono, Bohicket, and Kiawah Indians, were already living on the island.

The settlers brought the crop, indigo, from Barbados and cultivated it in the Lowcountry of Johns Island. By the mid-1700s, indigo became the main export for the island. A popular bright blue dye, indigo grown on Johns Island was commonly sold to England. During the height of indigo production, the Stono Rebellion occurred. The settlers relied on slaves to grow and produce their crops. In 1739, a group of slaves on Johns Island rebelled and attempted to escape to Florida, which was under the rule of the Spanish at the time.

However, the uprising was unsuccessful and plantation owners captured the slaves before they could reach freedom. During the Revolutionary War, the British market for indigo was disrupted, and England began to turn to India for its indigo supply. By the 1800s, indigo was no longer listed as a crop for Johns Island.

Johns Island has been the site of several important historical events. Occupied by British troops during the Revolutionary War, Johns Island also endured the Battle of Bloody Bridge during the Civil War. Today, visitors can view the historical site marking the Civil War battle at the Burdens Causeway.

Currently, Johns Island has a population of 21,500 and growing. The nearness of downtown Charleston, the beautiful scenery of the Lowcountry, and the nearby sandy beaches of the barrier islands make Johns Island a popular spot for new development.

What Do People Do at Johns Island?

Today, Johns Island is known for local farmers’ markets, historical parks, and towering oak trees dripping with Spanish moss. Although new developments are cropping up on the island, about 75% of the island remains rural with agricultural and horse farms, large acreage estates, and waterfront communities. Just a few miles south is the resort community of Kiawah Island.

One of the main attractions on Johns Island is the Angel Oak, a live oak tree that is thought to be the largest living oak tree east of the Mississippi River. Estimated to be around 400 years old, it’s the oldest tree in South Carolina. The massive tree is 65 feet tall and 25.5 feet around. Further, it provides shade to a staggering 17,000 square foot area. Surrounding the tree is a small park with a visitor’s center and a gift shop.

Another popular activity on the island is shopping at the Freshfields Village, an open-air shopping center with over 30 shops, numerous restaurants, and a boutique hotel.

The Goatery at Kiawah River is a small artisan goat dairy farm specializing in goat cheese and soaps. The farm offers private tours, classes for children, and goat yoga. The farm also doubles as a goat sanctuary, offering many goats a forever home.

Where Is Johns Island on a Map?

Johns Island is in between Charleston and the barrier islands. It’s surrounded by Kiawah, Seabrook, Wadmalaw, Edisto, James, and Folly Islands. The Stono and Kiawah Rivers separate Johns Island from the mainland and the barrier islands.

What Animals Live on Johns Island?

Johns Island is teeming with wildlife. Although there are many homes, shops, and restaurants on the island, much of the land remains undeveloped, providing habitat for numerous species. On the island, it’s common to see deer, raccoons, coyotes, bobcats, otters, wild hogs, and even alligators.

The rivers and marshes on the island are abundant with oysters, trout, black sea bass, bluefish, and bottlenose dolphins. Birds found in the area include many species such as osprey, bald eagles, wild turkeys, and egrets.

The photo featured at the top of this post is © photo.ua/Shutterstock.com

Residents fed up with 'deplorable' living conditions at Johns Island apartment complex

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — It started as an island paradise, but residents at a Johns Island apartment complex say their home now resembles the woods.The residents of Sea Island Apartments, which houses about 48 people off Maybank Highway, are speaking out against what they describe as "deplorable" conditions.Read more: ...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — It started as an island paradise, but residents at a Johns Island apartment complex say their home now resembles the woods.

The residents of Sea Island Apartments, which houses about 48 people off Maybank Highway, are speaking out against what they describe as "deplorable" conditions.

Read more: One80 Place launches eviction prevention line to support Charleston renters

"We have seen grass grow almost knee and chest high," said Farley, a disabled military veteran who has been living in the complex for six years. "You see fallen trees in the area, people not receiving maintenance, and overloaded trash bin."

In addition to the overgrown vegetation, the residents are concerned about random visits from wildlife. They say it seems management has slacked off and there's been little to no communication.

"You're forced to pay rent on time, but still, your issues are going unaddressed," Farley said. "We'll reach out to management and they haven't meet with us. Every time, they change management or owners. Nobody has contact to it."

It started as an island paradise, but residents at a Johns Island apartment complex say their home now resembles the woods. (WCIV)

There is also only one trashcan in the entire community and a small number of parking spaces.

"You have disabled people having to walk all the way down to one trash bin," Farley said. "There are not enough handicap parking spots. (Management) told us we'd have to park on the side of the road if there are no parking spaces."

"It's time we be up to date, as we were before," said Charlotte Turner, who has been living in the complex for 10 years. "Management needs to show a serious concern about resident complaints, at least be willing to meet or communicate."

Read more: Mayor Tecklenburg to host ribbon cutting for six new affordable housing properties in Charleston

A councilman was reached for comment on this area, but he was unable to conduct an interview due to prior commitments. A representative from the Charleston Development Group was also reached for comment.

Charleston city and county pledge more traffic relief is coming for Johns Island

JOHNS ISLAND — In a CVS parking lot next to what is perhaps the most dreaded intersection on Johns Island, a pickup truck pulled up next to Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg, prompting a woman to yell “fix the roads!”That’s what Tecklenburg and several city and county officials had come to talk about the morning of Nov. 2. Rapid growth and development have created notorious traffic snarls, largely because there are only two ways on and off the island, which is partly in the city limits and otherwise governed by...

JOHNS ISLAND — In a CVS parking lot next to what is perhaps the most dreaded intersection on Johns Island, a pickup truck pulled up next to Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg, prompting a woman to yell “fix the roads!”

That’s what Tecklenburg and several city and county officials had come to talk about the morning of Nov. 2. Rapid growth and development have created notorious traffic snarls, largely because there are only two ways on and off the island, which is partly in the city limits and otherwise governed by the county.

At Maybank Highway at River Road, Charleston’s mayor and two County Council members said the governments agree on plans for significant traffic relief getting on and off the island. Short-term plans call for realigning that intersection to improve traffic flow.

Much larger plans — the long-discussed “southern pitchfork” and adding a second lane on Maybank Highway between River Road and the Stono River — would need to be designed, permitted and funded. And that would take years.

“We’ll be dead by the time it happens,” said Gary Worth, a local resident who was among a small crowd of onlookers at the press conference. County Council members Joe Boykin and Jenny Honeycutt joined Tecklenburg to announce the road plans.

“Until now there wasn’t a firm commitment by both governments to do this,” said Tecklenburg. “That’s what’s new.”

He said city and county officials have been meeting since June to work on conceptual plans, cooperating “like I’ve never seen before,” he said.

Palmetto Politics

Boykin said one of the largest plans calls for shifting the end of Cane Slash Road a bit closer to Maybank Highway so that it would align with the proposed “southern pitchfork” that would run from River Road to Maybank Highway, near the bridge.

There’s also a northern pitchfork, and that road is nearly complete. It will allow traffic coming onto the island on Maybank Highway, which would have turned right on River Road at the intersection, to instead take the new road from Maybank to River and avoid the intersection. The southern pitchfork would do the same, but on the opposite side of Maybank Highway.

Jimmy Kerr, who owns the large property the southern pitchfork would cut through, agreed to the plan years ago. At the event Nov. 2, he said he’s been talking with the city for years about the plan.

“There’s no question that we are playing catch-up,” said Tecklenburg.

“The city and the county together are committed to four lanes between here and the bridge — four lanes,” he said. “We are committed to the southern pitchfork as well.”

The plan to have two lanes running from River Road down Maybank Highway to the bridge now calls for routing those lanes around some of the grand Live Oak trees that line the road. The much-beloved trees that line many roads on Johns Island have complicated many road plans because residents and officials are loathe to cut them down.

At least one man in the small crowd watching the announcement found the timing, five days before the election, a bit suspect.

“It feels a little like political grandstanding,” said Tommy Moles, who said he moved to Johns Island from the Charleston peninsula two years ago. “We hear about plan after plan, but nothing seems to happen.”

Moles said he isn’t affiliated with any of the mayoral candidates’ campaigns.

Tecklenburg said plans to unveil the road proposals had been in the works since September and had just become finalized.

“This was not a campaign event,” he said.

The realignment of the River Road and Maybank Highway intersection should be complete in the first several months of 2024, officials said. The new lanes and the southern pitchfork are untold years away, but now the city and county agree on those road plans.

Editorial: Seabrook Island, other beach towns, should respect Johns Island growth boundary

There are several powerful reasons why Seabrook Island Town Council should reject a proposed annexation that would pave the way for a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages near the town’s northern limits.The additional boat and car traffic would create more congestion on Betsy Kerrison Parkway in particular and Johns Island in general, as well as more pollution to the otherwise pristine Bohicket Creek. But the biggest reason Town Council should reject the 18-acre annexation is the dangero...

There are several powerful reasons why Seabrook Island Town Council should reject a proposed annexation that would pave the way for a new boat dock, private clubhouse, boathouse, pool house and 10 rental cottages near the town’s northern limits.

The additional boat and car traffic would create more congestion on Betsy Kerrison Parkway in particular and Johns Island in general, as well as more pollution to the otherwise pristine Bohicket Creek. But the biggest reason Town Council should reject the 18-acre annexation is the dangerous precedent it would set, a precedent that would erode the rural character of southern Johns Island.

Decades ago, local governments, led by the city of Charleston and Charleston County, agreed on an urban growth boundary across Johns Island and other areas. The big idea was to ensure their zoning and other policies were synchronized to allow suburban development to continue to spread, but only up to a point, beyond which the existing rural nature would be preserved. The boundary has generally worked well, but as with so much other conservation work, it needs to be embraced and reaffirmed by each new generation.

Seabrook Island’s potential move would mark one of the first and most dramatic annexations by a municipality into the rural portion of the island; if it succeeds, it almost assuredly wouldn’t be the last, and it could hasten the unraveling of the boundary line — and increase development pressures on the shrinking amount of land on the rural side of the boundary.

Robby Maynor of the Coastal Conservation League agrees that annexing and rezoning this property on the rural side of the urban growth boundary would set a disastrous precedent on the county’s Sea Islands and could lead to annexation battles such as those that are playing out along the most rural stretches of the upper Ashley River, whose rural historic district remains in jeopardy from encroaching homes, stores and the traffic they bring. Approving the marina project would be “like kicking an anthill and hoping you don’t get bit,” he says.

The case that the property’s owner and other supporters have made for the annexation is that it would give Seabrook Island future control of the site and limit future development there, according to reporter Warren Wise. But the proposal appears to us as designed to facilitate development, not to curb it. Annexing the site, which is next to Bohicket Marina, would allow it to tie into the town’s sewer system.

Unfortunately, Seabrook Island’s Planning Commission has recommended annexing the site and rezoning it for a mixed-used development. We urge Town Council members to reject that move when they consider the matter Aug. 22.

As Mr. Wise noted, the project is a scaled-down version of a 30-year-old Andell Harbor project that state environmental regulators rightly and mercifully rejected. While this is smaller, with only about 4 acres of development near the creek and the rest set aside for open space, it still would represent an unwelcome and disturbing encroachment into the rural area between the barrier islands of Kiawah and Seabrook and the suburban growth from the city of Charleston.

Last year, we urged elected officials, neighborhood leaders and planners with Charleston County and the two beach towns to come up with a mutually agreed-upon overlay for their shared area at the southern tip of Johns Island. That overlay should guide future development toward the kinds of uses — and the sizes and scale — residents of all three jurisdictions would most like to see, and help address growing real estate pressures in a way residents prefer. We repeat the call for regional cooperation, and Seabrook Island’s rejection of this annexation would be an important first step.

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