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Pressure Washing in Summerville, SC

South Carolina is undoubtedly one of the best places to call home in the Southeast. Cities like Charleston boast a rich history, pleasant climate, delicious food, friendly locals, and a laid-back atmosphere that captures the essence of southern hospitality. However, for homeowners and business owners, living in Charleston comes with its own set of challenges, especially when it comes to maintaining the appearance of your property.

The humid weather in the area often results in mold and algae growth on surfaces like wood and concrete, which can make your property look unkempt and neglected. Fortunately, Peppers Pressure Washing can help restore your property's beauty and prevent future growth and grime.

Why Choose Peppers Pressure Washing?

When it comes to pressure washing in Summerville, SC, our #1 goal is delivering exceptional pressure washing services by going above and beyond to make sure our clients are satisfied. We ensure their satisfaction by prioritizing good old-fashioned hard work, honest pricing, ongoing communication, advanced training, and industry-leading customer service.

Our pressure washing company in South Carolina is the perfect choice to protect your home or business from mold and mildew across various surfaces. In doing so, we can help minimize unsightly objects like bird's nests and spiderwebs while protecting your property from damage to windows, gutters, roofing, and more. As a licensed, insured pressure washing company, our customer's health and happiness always come first - no questions asked.

So, when you hire Peppers Pressure Washing, you can rest easy knowing our experts will treat your home as if it were our own. When they need the highest quality pressure washing services, clients come to us because our team is:

  • Licensed & Insured
  • Residential & Commercial Pressure Washing Experts
  • Equipped with Modern Equipment & Pressure Washing Tools
  • Provide Free Estimates
  • Serve Greater Charleston, SC
  • Has Outstanding Reviews on Google & Facebook
  • Have Years of Experience with Professional Pressure Washing

Service Areas

If you're looking for a dedicated professional that will do the job right, you're in the right place. With over 10 years experience, we have learned to improve our skills and keep our equipment up to date for the best results.

Kickstart Your Home's Curb Appeal with Residential Pressure Washing in Summerville, SC

Living in the Lowcountry often means that your home's exterior will suffer from harsh elements such as mildew, dirt, and pollen. If left uncleaned, these contaminants can cause damage to surfaces like brick, stucco, and vinyl over time. At Peppers Pressure Washing, we offer a safe and effective cleaning solution that utilizes time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants from your home's exterior so that it remains uniquely beautiful year-round.

Unlike some pressure washing services in Charleston, however, we have the capability to perform traditional pressure washing as well as low-pressure washing for residential properties.

What is Low-Pressure Washing?

Most often known as "soft washing," this process involves washing and rinsing your windows and gutters using gentle pressure. Unlike high-pressure tactics - which can cause damage when used by amateurs in inappropriate spaces - soft wash cleaning for your home is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae from porous surfaces without causing harm. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about losing curb appeal or reducing the resale value of your home due to stripped paint or ruined siding.

Our techniques use gentle water pressure and an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants without causing harm to your plants or landscaping. That's why many homeowners ask for a combination of soft washing and pressure washing in Summerville, SC - to address the hard-to-clean areas as well as the more sensitive areas.

Once the cleaning agent has removed the mold, algae, and other contaminants, our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home, leaving it looking squeaky clean and envy-worthy to your neighbors. Some additional benefits of Peppers Pressure Washing's soft washing approach include:

  • Reduced Chance of Water Penetration and Damage to Your Home
  • Fewer Ladders and Scaffolding Means Can Mean Reduced Labor Costs
  • Mildew, Mold, and Algae are Killed at the Molecular Level
  • Less Water Needed to Clean Your Home vs. High-Pressure Washing
  • Your Home is Disinfected and Cleaned

Curious if our team can remove the mold and mildew from your driveway, walkways, back deck, and more? Give our office a call today - every estimate we provide is 100% free.

Pressure Washing Summerville, SC

The Toughest Items That Pressure Washing Can Clean

Experienced professionals can enhance your property's curb appeal with well-laid driveways and patios. The same goes for the fencing around your backyard, which can be painted and installed meticulously by experts. However, it's only a matter of time before stains, peeling paint, and other tough-to-remove items begin to sully your home's appearance. Fortunately, with an experienced pressure washing company by your side, you can bring life back to your home, even if it's been plagued by something like graffiti.

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Motor vehicles are notorious for leaving oil stains on driveways and in garages, which can be very difficult to get out if you don't know what you're doing. Fortunately, a high-pressure power washer will remove such stains. But even with a pressure washer, you'll need to use the appropriate cleaning solution to fully remove an oil stain from your driveway.

Motor vehicles are notorious for leaving oil stains on driveways and in garages, which can be very difficult to get out if you don't know what you're doing. Fortunately, a high-pressure power washer will remove such stains. But even with a pressure washer, you'll need to use the appropriate cleaning solution to fully remove an oil stain from your driveway.

Motor vehicles are notorious for leaving oil stains on driveways and in garages, which can be very difficult to get out if you don't know what you're doing. Fortunately, a high-pressure power washer will remove such stains. But even with a pressure washer, you'll need to use the appropriate cleaning solution to fully remove an oil stain from your driveway.

Motor vehicles are notorious for leaving oil stains on driveways and in garages, which can be very difficult to get out if you don't know what you're doing. Fortunately, a high-pressure power washer will remove such stains. But even with a pressure washer, you'll need to use the appropriate cleaning solution to fully remove an oil stain from your driveway.

What Client Say About Us

Commercial Building Pressure Washing in South Carolina

Entrepreneurs understand the importance of presenting a positive image for their brand and business. A first impression is often the only opportunity to showcase what you have to offer. Neglecting the cleanliness and appearance of your warehouse, apartment complex, or storefront could lead to lost revenue. Put yourself in your customers' shoes: If a business owner fails to maintain walkways and other heavily trafficked areas around their location, they may not put much effort into providing quality products.

Every aspect of your building, entrance, parking lot, walking path, or storefront presents an opportunity to impress customers. With commercial pressure washing, you can capitalize on that opportunity and even help retain the same customers you initially impressed. The bottom line? If cleanliness and curb appeal are non-negotiable in your line of business, it's time to call Peppers Pressure Washing for a free estimate.

Don't delay - waiting to have your business pressure washed can end up costing you money. That's why our pressure washing company offers convenient monthly cleanings. We can arrange routine maintenance washing to help keep your business fresh and clean, helping you set the stage for success year-round.

Our company specializes in many types of commercial pressure washing in Summerville, SC. Some of the most popular business locations we serve include the following:

  • Pressure Washing for Dumpster Pads
  • Pressure Washing for HOAs
  • Pressure Washing for Commercial Buildings
  • Pressure Washing for Sidewalks
  • Pressure Washing for Storefronts
  • Pressure Washing for Restaurants
  • Pressure Washing for Apartments & Condos
  • Much More

5 Signs That It's Time for Commercial Pressure Washing in Summerville, SC

Investing in exterior cleaning is a wise decision for any business owner. Services like pressure washing enhance curb appeal, attract new and returning customers, and show you care about the appearance of your business. But if you're like other hardworking entrepreneurs who are stretched thin as it is, keeping up with cleanliness is easier said than done, especially outside your property.

Here are a few of the most common signs that it's time to consider pressure washing for your business in South Carolina.

Have you noticed that revenue is down, but you can't put your finger on why? In some instances, it could be because of your company's entryways and exteriors. A well-maintained exterior is essential for any business, whether it's a law firm, retail store, or any other establishment. Customers expect to see a property that looks clean, safe, and comfortable. They don't want to feel surrounded by discolored surfaces, mold, or mildew.

Have you noticed that revenue is down, but you can't put your finger on why? In some instances, it could be because of your company's entryways and exteriors. A well-maintained exterior is essential for any business, whether it's a law firm, retail store, or any other establishment. Customers expect to see a property that looks clean, safe, and comfortable. They don't want to feel surrounded by discolored surfaces, mold, or mildew.

Have you noticed that revenue is down, but you can't put your finger on why? In some instances, it could be because of your company's entryways and exteriors. A well-maintained exterior is essential for any business, whether it's a law firm, retail store, or any other establishment. Customers expect to see a property that looks clean, safe, and comfortable. They don't want to feel surrounded by discolored surfaces, mold, or mildew.

Have you noticed that revenue is down, but you can't put your finger on why? In some instances, it could be because of your company's entryways and exteriors. A well-maintained exterior is essential for any business, whether it's a law firm, retail store, or any other establishment. Customers expect to see a property that looks clean, safe, and comfortable. They don't want to feel surrounded by discolored surfaces, mold, or mildew.

You Can't Get Rid of Mold, Mildew, and Other Stains

If you notice unsightly stains, mold, or mildew on the outside of your business, it may be a sign of standing water issues or simply a lack of regular cleaning. Sure, you could make your own bleach solution and try to tackle the problem yourself. But you run the risk of damaging your property and even harming yourself in the process. The alternative? Contact Peppers Pressure Washing for thoroughly effective pressure washing in Summerville, SC.

Why Hire a Professional Pressure Washing Company in South Carolina?

At Peppers Pressure Washing, one of the most common questions we receive is why a homeowner or business owner should or should not hire professionals to handle pressure washing. We get it - most folks are on budgets and must be careful about spending frivolously on chores that they may be able to do on their own. And while we're big proponents of DIY projects at home and at work, pressure washing in Summerville, SC, should always be performed by trained professionals. Here's why.

Safety

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Cost Effectiveness

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Quicker Turnaround Times

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Eco-Friendly Techniques

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Avoid Damage to Your Home or Business

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

Pressure washing often involves heavy-duty equipment, ladders, and more, which can be both intimidating and dangerous for untrained individuals. It's important to understand that pressure washing machines can be quite dangerous if not handled properly.

The Top Choice for Pressure Washing in Summerville, SC

At Peppers Pressure Washing, we evaluate every pressure washing project with a fresh eye, knowing that no two situations are ever the same. As a licensed and insured pressure washing company in South Carolina, our goal is to leave your home and property looking its best, whether you need a one-time cleaning for your driveway or recurring services for your business. Whatever your needs may be, you can always rely on Peppers Pressure Washing for high-quality power washing at cost-conscious prices.

Contact our office today to arrange for your free estimate.

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Latest News in Summerville, SC

Summerville mayoral candidates discuss key issues facing the growing town

SUMMERVILLE — With Ricky Waring retiring, the mayoral seat in this growing community 20 miles north of Charleston is up for grabs.The candidates: Dickie Miler, a Summerville native and real estate broker; Russ Touchberry, another Summerville native and current town councilman; and Vickie Fagan, who relocated from Staten Island more than a ...

SUMMERVILLE — With Ricky Waring retiring, the mayoral seat in this growing community 20 miles north of Charleston is up for grabs.

The candidates: Dickie Miler, a Summerville native and real estate broker; Russ Touchberry, another Summerville native and current town councilman; and Vickie Fagan, who relocated from Staten Island more than a decade ago.

The Post and Courier spoke with the mayoral candidates about some of the big issues and concerns residents have in Summerville.

Fate of the old hospital

Miler said the property at 500 N. Main St., which has become a hot-button issue over the past few months, should be preserved. He has been a vocal opponent of the redevelopment of the property but said if there is redevelopment it should be strategic, sensible and promote enough economic vitality to warrant any changes made.

Touchberry hopes to preserve the old hospital as well, acknowledging it’s an important property. He also said its redevelopment can benefit the town and if done right could be a model for how other properties can be remade.

“We’ve lost the look and feel of Summerville on that side of the railroad tracks all the way to I-26,” Touchberry said. “This is an opportunity for us to have this reinvestment and reestablish our brand, which is what made us so special to begin with.”

Fagan also wants the property to be preserved but believes it can be repurposed as is. With all the available parking, the space could be used for emergency personnel, she said.

Growth and development

Miler said he supports a strategic approach to Summerville’s growth and would want to annex all he could on the periphery to protect the town’s border from neighboring cities like North Charleston and Goose Creek, which are also growing quickly.

“If we annex things on the outside, then we can control how we develop on the inside,” Miler said. “When and if we have to move and grow, we do it the way we want to do it, bringing the developer we want to bring in, have the neighborhood designed the way we want it.”

Touchberry pointed out that Summerville’s municipal boundaries are irregular but could be fixed by aligning the town’s comprehensive plan with the plans of Berkeley and Dorchester counties, and making sure all zoning standards line up as well. He added that if the town doesn’t have a strategic annexation plan, Summerville could easily be encircled by other municipalities.

Fagan said she’d like to assemble a task force for growth management and include voices from elected officials, civic groups and businesses. She said she values input from everyone and paying attention to how growth is affecting people in different areas can help the town come up with a plan as a united front.

Traffic and transport

Miler said he would want to incorporate more public transportation and improve sidewalks and bike paths so people can get around without a car.

“Building more roads is not always the answer,” Miler said.

He added he would be willing to reduce the median for some roads and even remove parking spots — like the parallel parking spots on Main Street at Hutchinson Square — so traffic isn’t as backed up.

Touchberry has been advocating for infrastructure improvements, such as sidewalk repairs, but one of his biggest priorities is finding a way to connect the Berlin G. Myers Parkway to Interstate 26 without the need to use, or cross, Main Street. He said he’s working with the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments, as well as Berkeley County and the town, to study that corridor and identify solutions.

Touchberry added that the town missed an opportunity in having the Lowcountry Rapid Transit stop in Summerville; the furthest it is planned to go for now is Ladson. He said he’s ready to fight to make sure the second phase is completed, so the workforce in Summerville can use it to get to Charleston and reduce commute time.

Bugs, blood & beatings: Docs reveal claims against Summerville youth facility

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Newly obtained documents show dozens of complaints have been filed in recent years against a Summerville youth treatment facility, alleging there are bugs, abuse, dangerously low staffing levels, violent fights and blood and vomit smeared throughout the building.Mary Wilcox’s grandson spent time in that facility, Palmetto Summerville Behavioral Health, earlier this year.“Terror” is how she describes her feelings about the residential facility, which is for children and teens ages 7-1...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Newly obtained documents show dozens of complaints have been filed in recent years against a Summerville youth treatment facility, alleging there are bugs, abuse, dangerously low staffing levels, violent fights and blood and vomit smeared throughout the building.

Mary Wilcox’s grandson spent time in that facility, Palmetto Summerville Behavioral Health, earlier this year.

“Terror” is how she describes her feelings about the residential facility, which is for children and teens ages 7-18 with emotional and behavioral issues.

Her 13-year-old grandson was admitted to the youth residential treatment facility earlier this year.

For weeks, he stayed locked behind the doors of the facility; for weeks he recounted the horror and violence to his grandmother; and for weeks, Wilcox said she fought to get him out.

“[He] was abused in ways that most parents would say would be the worst thing to happen to their child,” Wilcox says.

During phone calls with his grandmother and an in-person visit, he detailed vicious fights, sexual assaults and abuse.

“He was struggling to deal with what was going on, and he attempted to escape,” Wilcox said. “He was handled by a staff member who slammed his head into a chain link fence causing a gash, causing blood to drop down his face.”

Her grandson’s story is not the first troubling one that has been shared. Nearly 200 pages of documents obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request for complaints against the facility in the past few years detail allegations of what some say erupts in the hallways and common areas and what hides, tucked away in patients’ rooms.

The dozens of complaints filed describe alleged bug infestations, inadequate staffing, filthy conditions, overmedicating and a prison-like environment.

One complaint says a staff member attacked a patient.

“On the video, it was observed that a staff member placing [redacted] into a choke hold and then it is observed on camera that same staff member punching [redacted] six times once [redacted] is taken down to the ground,” the complaint states.

Another states a patient was so heavily medicated they fainted. In a different complaint, an employee is accused of grabbing a patient by the shirt, pulling them down and kneeing them in the face.

“It does not surprise me at all,” Wilcox says. “My grandson communicated similar conditions to me. It is very alarming that this happened to my grandson; it’s alarming that children are in the facility still.”

One complaint alleges the facility frequently only has one nurse on duty with 60 patients and was so short-staffed they couldn’t provide proper treatment.

Another states there have been “numerous human rights violations” and claims patients are refused medical treatment and prescriptions.

“Supervisors explicitly tell staff to ‘treat them like prisoners because they are here for punishment’ rather than treating the patients with compassion as they go through treatment,” the complaint states.

Another complaint describes cockroaches and ants crawling around and blood and vomit smeared inside.

“[Palmetto Summerville] should be investigated,” Wilcox says. “They need to be checked out. They need to be monitored, and they need to be held accountable.”

The State Department of Health and Environmental Control is the agency responsible for investigating complaints against health facilities like Palmetto Summerville. It can also penalize them.

“When there is noncompliance with the licensing standards, the facility must submit an acceptable written plan of correction to DHEC that must be signed by the administrator and returned by the date specified on the report of inspection/investigation,” an email from DHEC states. “When DHEC determines that a facility is in violation of any statutory provision, rule, or regulation relating to the operation or maintenance of such facility, DHEC, upon proper notice to the licensee, may impose a monetary penalty, and deny, suspend, or revoke licenses.”

Last month, DHEC investigated two complaints against Palmetto Summerville, but no violations were cited, according to officials. In August, however, the facility was fined $19,000 for nine violations.

“DHEC executed a consent order with the facility in August after it was determined that it was appropriate to impose a civil monetary penalty for violations of Regulation 61-103,” the email from DHEC states.

Some of those violations, documents show, include failing to have a registered nurse immediately accessible by phone and available within 30 minutes, failing to notify DHEC of a serious accident or incident within 24 hours, failing to make sure residents were free from harm and failing to make sure medications were available for administration.

“[Patients] are further traumatized,” Wilcox says. “They are further placed into a downward spiral by being in these facilities.”

That downward spiral and that trauma, she says, prevent any effective treatment for the children who spend time at Palmetto Summerville and similar facilities.

Some studies show that could be right.

One study shows there’s not enough research to know if the interventions — therapy, activities and treatments — inside these facilities are effective or an effective use of money.

“We also don’t know a lot about what the, what treatments they’re actually getting because we don’t necessarily see the day-to-day life of these kids in these facilities,” Roderick Rose, an associate professor at the University of Maryland Baltimore and researcher in the study, says.

A common trend in the facilities: Medication. One study shows about 90 percent of stays at facilities analyzed included an antipsychotic medication, even though only 3 percent of patients were diagnosed with a psychotic disorder.

“You also see just a lot of medicating children,” Rose says.

For her grandson, Wilcox believes the best treatment has been being back home. He’s in school and playing basketball and is doing better. The trauma from the facility still lingers, however, and Wilcox says she prays other children can get the help they need outside of the gates of Palmetto Summerville.

“I am so very grateful that he is one child that escaped being in the situation he was in long,” she says. “Other children, as well, to be rescued, which is a most appropriate word. They need to be rescued from these facilities.”

Norman Bradley, the director of risk management and performance improvement for Palmetto Summerville Behavioral Health released this statement:

Due to HIPAA patient privacy laws, we cannot offer comment on specific patients or their care.

Palmetto Summerville Behavioral Health takes all allegations of abuse seriously and completes full investigations as warranted. Any and all allegations required to be reported to the Department of Health and Environmental Control have been done, and necessary action plans have been implemented to address the issues raised. Recent site visits by DHEC have been positive and have resulted in no findings.

Palmetto Summerville Behavioral Health is a residential treatment facility for girls and boys ages 7 to 18, in need of a highly structured, therapeutic environment. Our patient satisfaction scores reflect the care that is delivered by our compassionate and dedicated team.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

‘We’re going to break our own record,’ Trump tells SC voters

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Former President Donald Trump took the stage at a campaign event in Summerville Monday predicting a record-breaking win in the South Carolina Primary as he campaigned for a second term as commander-in-chief.Trump is speaking Monday afternoon at Sportsman Boats in his first visit to South Carolina since the Silver Elephant Gala last month.He told the crowd that his last two years in office were the best two years South Carolina boat builders and South Carolina businesses have ever had, saying that boat...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Former President Donald Trump took the stage at a campaign event in Summerville Monday predicting a record-breaking win in the South Carolina Primary as he campaigned for a second term as commander-in-chief.

Trump is speaking Monday afternoon at Sportsman Boats in his first visit to South Carolina since the Silver Elephant Gala last month.

He told the crowd that his last two years in office were the best two years South Carolina boat builders and South Carolina businesses have ever had, saying that boat builders couldn’t make the boats fast enough.

“When I left the office business was roaring like a 400 horsepower Mercury outboard motor,” Trump said. “But then the economy slammed into a pile of rocks known as crooked Joe Biden.”

He promised to end Biden’s “war on American energy” and reclaim energy independence.

“In other words, we will drill, baby, drill,” he said.

Trump said he won South Carolina twice by record numbers and pledged to do it again.

“We did phenomenally here. We’ve always done well here and we’re going to do it at a level that nobody’s ever seen,” he said. “So we broke the record twice. We’re going to break it a third time. We’re going to break our own record.”

He said he intends to “take back our country and we’re going to make America great again.”

Before Trump’s speech, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster told the crowd he went into the State House about a month after Trump went into the White House.

“And South Carolina has been booming ever since,” he said. “But then in January 2021, everything changed.”

McMaster said his administration has had to fight the Biden Administration “every day.” He cited the Biden Administration’s COVID-19 vaccine mandates for military personnel, and accused it of destroying the nation’s borders and the nation’s energy independence.

“From 2016 until now, [the Biden Administration] has been doing anything and everything they could, legal, illegal, ethical, unethical, unheard of, unprecedented, to do one thing: That includes two bogus impeachments and full-of-baloney indictments to do what? To stop one man, to stop our man from being president of the United States,” McMaster said.

Dorchester County deputies said earlier on Monday that Trump’s visit to Summerville would cause delays on Highway 78 from Summerville east of Berlin G. Myers Parkway to Jedburg Road at Mallard Road. Drivers in the area are asked to search for alternate routes if they don’t live or work along Highway 78 and are encouraged to use other entrances to neighborhoods in the area.

Traffic delays are expected to last through about 5 p.m. Monday but the delays could be extended.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Summerville woman among 4 sentenced in PPP scheme

Lori Hammond, aka Lori McCracken, aka Lori Blakely, 54, of Summerville, Christopher Conrad, 41, of Holly Hill, Catherine “Cassie” Needham, 38, of Manning, and Jontrell Wright, 37, of Orangeburg, were sentenced to federal prison after being convicted of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and wire fraud for submitting fraudulent Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan applications and misusing the funds.Evidence presented during the sentencing hearings established Hammond submitted more than $11 million in fraudulent loan applic...

Lori Hammond, aka Lori McCracken, aka Lori Blakely, 54, of Summerville, Christopher Conrad, 41, of Holly Hill, Catherine “Cassie” Needham, 38, of Manning, and Jontrell Wright, 37, of Orangeburg, were sentenced to federal prison after being convicted of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and wire fraud for submitting fraudulent Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan applications and misusing the funds.

Evidence presented during the sentencing hearings established Hammond submitted more than $11 million in fraudulent loan applications for PPP and COVID-19 Economic Injury Disaster (EIDL) loans for her enrichment and the enrichment of her co-conspirators. The loan applications contained inflated employee and payroll funds, were often submitted on behalf of companies that did not exist or were inactive and included fake business addresses and fraudulent tax documents. More than $5.8 million in PPP and EIDL loans were paid to Hammond and her co-conspirators.

“While millions of South Carolinians were struggling during the pandemic, these defendants defrauded the systems meant to provide relief,” said Adair F. Boroughs, U.S. Attorney for the District of South Carolina. “We will continue to pursue bad actors such as these and hold them accountable for exploiting these resources for their own gain.”

Hammond personally received $3,162,038.50 in PPP and EIDL loan funds. She spent the money on personal expenses, including purchasing a home, luxury vehicles, a golf cart and plastic surgery. She was sentenced to 80 months imprisonment, followed by a three-year term of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,722,932.50 in restitution, representing the remaining outstanding unpaid loan funds.

Conrad fraudulently received $898,300 in loans and spent the funds on unapproved personal expenses. He was sentenced to 12 months and one day incarceration, followed by a three-year term of supervised release and ordered to pay $898,300 in restitution.

Needham fraudulently received $1,244,200 and used the funds for improper personal expenses, including purchasing property, a golf cart, a pool, home improvements and plastic surgery. She was sentenced to 21 months incarceration, followed by a three-year term of supervised release and ordered to pay $1,244,200 in restitution.

Wright fraudulently received $561,700 in loan funds and spent the funds on personal expenses. He was sentenced to 15 months incarceration, followed by a three-year term of supervised release and ordered to pay $561,700 in restitution.

“These sentences reflect the severity of PPP loan fraud,” said Steve Jensen, special agent in charge of the FBI Columbia Field Office. “Such crimes challenge the integrity of relief programs designed for those who need assistance most. The FBI is committed to holding offenders accountable and safeguarding loan programs to ensure the public’s trust in our financial systems.”

Assistant U.S. Attorney Emily Limehouse prosecuted this case. The Hon. David C. Norton presided over the sentencing hearings in Charleston.

2023 Summerville Italian Feast is Oct. 8

Get ready for a taste of Italy right in the heart of Historical Downtown Summerville. The 2023 Summerville Italian Feast is back, and it promises to be an unforgettable day of cultural celebration, delicious cuisine and community togetherness. The event, which started in 2012 with 11 ven...

Get ready for a taste of Italy right in the heart of Historical Downtown Summerville. The 2023 Summerville Italian Feast is back, and it promises to be an unforgettable day of cultural celebration, delicious cuisine and community togetherness. The event, which started in 2012 with 11 vendors, has grown to 87 vendors this year.

The 2023 Summerville Italian Feast is 11-a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 8, at Hutchinson Square in downtown Summerville.

“Indulge your senses in the rich flavors of Italy as we pay tribute to Italian-American heritage,” according to a press release. “With over 87 local craft and food booths, as well as a delectable lineup of food trucks, you can savor your favorite Italian dishes just like mama used to make. From mouthwatering pasta dishes to scrumptious cannoli and everything in between, your taste buds are in for a treat.”

In addition to the food, the 2023 Summerville Italian Feast will showcase the talent of students from Dorchester District 2 schools who will entertain the crowd with performances.

One of the more significant aspects of this event is its charitable mission. All proceeds from the Summerville Italian Feast will benefit the Dorchester School District 2 Educational Foundation. Your attendance and participation in this celebration will directly contribute to educational programs and initiatives within the community.

Visit www.AngieMizzell.com for more information

Angie Mizzell is a new author who recently released her memoir, “Girl in The Spotlight.”

Born and raised in the Charleston area, Mizzell attended Hanahan High School and the University of South Carolina for broadcast journalism. Mizzell is a former morning anchor on WCSC Live 5 News (CBS) here in the late 1990s to early 2000s, and then later was a reporter at WCBD NBC 2 (in 2003).

Her book was published through Publish Her, an independent publisher in Minnesota. She also has a background in public relations, marketing and event planning. The public can meet her when she has a book signing event from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 9, at Main Street Reads, 115 S. Main St. in Summerville.

Regan: Angie, how did this book come about?

Mizzell: Anchoring the morning show at a top station in Charleston, my hometown, was a dream come true. Years after I left that career, I knew it had changed me in a significant way, and I wanted to explore the turning points that led to taking a major leap of faith. I worked on this book on and off for more than 10 years. The deep belief that my story could inspire others as they navigate their life transitions motivated me to see it through to publication. I hope my story will inspire others to trust their hearts and be courageous with their lives.

R: Your description on your Facebook profile page says you are an author, speaker and conversation catalyst. Tell me about that.

M: As a professional storyteller and communicator, I always seek opportunities to create a safe and inviting space for people to share their stories and perspectives. Sharing our stories helps us create connections and community and feel less alone. Whether someone is reading my writing or listening to me give a talk, I want it to feel like we are sitting together on a front porch or sofa, having a meaningful conversation.

R: Where do you think you got that drive for your persistent pursuit of success?

M: When my career in TV news was taking off, I did not fully realize how my success was filling a void in my life. It was a temporary band-aid that covered up unprocessed childhood trauma and loss. It worked until everything I had been running from caught up with me. My story is about reaching a critical moment in my life when I suddenly had no choice but to turn and face my past and mixed-up beliefs about success and self-worth, and I began to imagine what it would take to feel free finally.

R: Did the book evolve — like you felt the need to do it?

M: It was something that evolved. When I started to question my path, I turned to my journal to help me process the feelings and thoughts that I was not ready to say aloud. In that private writing, I began to sense I was living a story I would tell one day. It would take more than a decade to piece it all together, but I finally had enough distance to share a personal story that illuminates the big picture of life. The story is mine. But I wrote it for the ones who might relate to it.

R: Are you planning a book tour around the Southeast with book talks and signing events?

M: I am holding a virtual book club party Wednesday, Dec. 13, which is open to anyone. I will do a series of talks at Charleston Country libraries in the new year. My website has all the details about the events.

R: Do you have another book planned in the future?

M: I have several book ideas and a podcast I will launch next year. Whatever comes next, my mission will remain the same: encouraging others to live more courageous and authentic lives.

R: What else would you like to say?

M: I would love it if people joined my online community by signing up for my weekly newsletter, “Hello Friday.” People can subscribe for free at angiemizzell.substack.com.

Mary E. Regan is a columnist for The Journal Scene and a freelance publicist with her propublicist.com consultancy. She is always seeking new publicity clients and writing projects. Email story ideas to [email protected].

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